The attempted kidnapping trial of 46 year-old Terrence Roberts began this morning in Missoula District Court before Judge Leslie Halligan.

The alleged teen victim testified about what happened on July 21 on a river trail near Caras Park.

According to court documents, the defendant, Terrence Roberts, who provided a fictitious name upon his arrest of Dean Graybull, allegedly accosted the juvenile girl and attempted to kidnap her.

Deputy County Attorney Mac Bloom asked the witness to relate the facts of what happened that day.

She said after following her down the trail, Roberts grabbed her arm and said ‘You’re coming with me,’.

Bloom asked her about what happened next.

“When he said to you, ‘you’re coming with me’, did that sound like a question or a demand?” he asked.

“A demand,” she said.

Bloom asked, “What was going through your mind at that moment?”

“I didn’t know if he was going to have control of the situation. I didn’t know if I was going to be raped or kidnapped,” she said tearfully.

Bloom then showed her a photo of the defendant.

“Is this the man who grabbed you,” he asked.

“Yes,” she said.

“Is that same man in the courtroom today,” he asked.

“Yes,” she said, indicating the defendant.

Judge Halligan admitted the photo into evidence.

Bloom also asked to have photos of the victim’s arm admitted into evidence, and Judge Halligan admitted them.

Roberts, who originally provided a false identity when he was arrested, has a criminal history over 30 pages long that stretches back to the 1990’s.

His public defender originally asked for Roberts to be released on his own recognizance, but Judge Halligan refused, and maintained his bail at $100,000.

The trial continues in Missoula District Court before Judge Halligan.

When not at trial, Roberts will remain in the Missoula County Jail on $100,000 bond.

According to Montana Code Annotated, A person convicted of the offense of kidnapping shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term of not less than 2 years or more than 10 years and may be fined not more than $50,000.

 

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