Today, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Montana Supreme Court was wrong in its decision to uphold a 1912 law known as the Corrupt Practices Act. The case, known as American Tradition Partnership vs. Bullock was not given a full hearing by the court, but was rejected via a summary reversal of the Montana Supreme Court's ruling.

The case has received much fanfare as it was one of the few cases that could have augmented the 2010 Citizen's United decision concerning corporate and trade union spending on elections. Instead of changing it's prior ruling on Citizen's United, the U.S. Supreme Court has in effect extended the reach of that ruling to apply to statewide elections as well as federal election. This means that there are no limits on political spending for corporations and trade unions, so long as that spending does not go directly to a particular campaign.

Specialist on Constitutional Law with the Independence Institute Robert Natelson comments on the ATP vs. Bullock decision: